The Hot List

When I was young the family would visit relatives in Arizona in the Spring. Since my father was a school teacher, it was natural to spend a week over the Easter Holiday communing with cactus, irrigation, and burning creosote. But one year we went to Phoenix for some sort of convention and it was in the heat of the summer. Back then few people had air conditioning and had to rely on water coolers to take the edge off the heat.

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Sperm Wars

The infantry attacked on the left flank and were repelled by heavy artillery; however, small, individual platoons continued to infiltrate through hidden rifts and arroyos. On the right flank a major calvary attack wrought havoc on the defending troops and, although suffering catastrophic destruction, opened a path for foot troops to exploit. Bodies were piling up, requiring urgent removal to avoid pestilence. A sudden counterattack by allied forces pressed the aggressor back from the main battlefield. Fighting was brutal. Millions died. But a shining champion strode through the carnage, slipped up an unprotected path, and captured the flag.

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Asian Flu

From the United States Center For Disease Control (CDC) web site:

1957-1958 Pandemic (H2N2 virus)


In February 1957, a new influenza A (H2N2) virus emerged in East Asia, triggering a pandemic (“Asian Flu”). This H2N2 virus was comprised of three different genes from an H2N2 virus that originated from an avian influenza A virus, including the H2 hemagglutinin and the N2 neuraminidase genes. It was first reported in Singapore in February 1957, Hong Kong in April 1957, and in coastal cities in the United States in summer 1957. The estimated number of deaths was 1.1 million worldwide and 116,000 in the United States.

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