What About This Wall?

From A Little History of Religion by Richard Holloway:

med_gallery_2_5_35255If daring to know how nature worked was one of the impulses of the Enlightenment, another was disgust with centuries of religious violence. Superstition was bad enough. War was worse. The thinkers of the Enlightenment noticed how religions always disagreed with each other. Each believed it possessed the truth revealed by God and the others were wrong. And when it got control of a country it tried to make everyone march to its drumbeat. That was bad enough. It was worse if there were just two religions in a country competing against each other. They would be at each other’s throats all the time, as they had been in Europe since the Reformation. But if there were thirty religions they all seemed to live in peace!

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Makes Sense

Yale psychiatrist explains how devotion to Trump is based on
emotional patterns most people grow out of by age five.

angry-trump-supporter-shutterstockRaw Story spoke with Yale psychiatry professor Bandy X. Lee on why the president’s supporters show such undying devotion to a man who’s repeatedly reneged on promises and whose tumultuous first term has been filled with shake-ups.

Bandy X. Lee: The sense of grandiose omnipotence that he displays seems especially appealing to his emotionally-needy followers. No matter what the world says, he fights back against criticism, continues to lie in the face of truth, and above all is still president. What matters is that he is winning, not whether he is honest or law-abiding. This may seem puzzling to the rest of us, but when you are overcome with feelings of powerlessness, this type of cartoonish, exaggerated force is often more important than true ability. This is the more primitive morality, as we call it, of “might makes right,” which in normal development you grow out of by age five.

Read the full article at Raw Story.

Deny, Deny, Deny

download-2.jpgWhen accused of sexual assault or other misdeeds by women, President Donald Trump says you’ve got to “deny, deny, deny,” according to veteran journalist Bob Woodward’s new book.

The book, “Fear: Trump in the White House,” was released Tuesday and details a White House is chaos. Woodward spoke to dozens of current and former officials for the book on background, meaning their names weren’t used.

The book includes a conversation between Trump and a “friend who had acknowledged some bad behavior toward women.” The friend was not named, but the president, who has been accused by more than a dozen women of inappropriate sexual behavior, offered some advice.

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