Makes Sense

Yale psychiatrist explains how devotion to Trump is based on
emotional patterns most people grow out of by age five.

angry-trump-supporter-shutterstockRaw Story spoke with Yale psychiatry professor Bandy X. Lee on why the president’s supporters show such undying devotion to a man who’s repeatedly reneged on promises and whose tumultuous first term has been filled with shake-ups.

Bandy X. Lee: The sense of grandiose omnipotence that he displays seems especially appealing to his emotionally-needy followers. No matter what the world says, he fights back against criticism, continues to lie in the face of truth, and above all is still president. What matters is that he is winning, not whether he is honest or law-abiding. This may seem puzzling to the rest of us, but when you are overcome with feelings of powerlessness, this type of cartoonish, exaggerated force is often more important than true ability. This is the more primitive morality, as we call it, of “might makes right,” which in normal development you grow out of by age five.

Read the full article at Raw Story.

Deny, Deny, Deny

download-2.jpgWhen accused of sexual assault or other misdeeds by women, President Donald Trump says you’ve got to “deny, deny, deny,” according to veteran journalist Bob Woodward’s new book.

The book, “Fear: Trump in the White House,” was released Tuesday and details a White House is chaos. Woodward spoke to dozens of current and former officials for the book on background, meaning their names weren’t used.

The book includes a conversation between Trump and a “friend who had acknowledged some bad behavior toward women.” The friend was not named, but the president, who has been accused by more than a dozen women of inappropriate sexual behavior, offered some advice.

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Grandfather Frog Speaks

An interesting speech from The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare:

LORENZO:

The reason is your spirits are attentive,
For do but note a wild and wanton herd
Or race of youthful and unhandled colts,
Fetching mad bounds, bellowing and neighing loud,
Which is the hot condition of their blood,
If they but hear perchance a trumpet sound,
Or any air of music touch their ears,
You shall perceive them make a mutual stand,
Their savage eyes turned to a modest gaze
By the sweet power of music. Therefore the poet
Did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones, and floods,
Since naught so stockish, hard, and full of rage
But music for the time doth change his nature.
The man that hath no music in himself,
Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds,
Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils.
The motions of his spirit are dull as night,
And his affections dark as Erebus.
Let no such man be trusted. Mark the music.

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