Puzzling …

graphic_20161116_Transition_v3_02.png

… and the gap is widening as more votes are counted. Let history recognize that a girl whooped Donald Trump without even having to cheat and lie. Trump relied on mendacity, low information voters, fear and loathing, a friendly FBI, and a friendly Russian cyber-infiltration … and still didn’t get as many votes as Hillary. Some mandate, huh?

It should be pretty clear that the Electoral College has lost its relevance. Created originally to avoid the danger of having a nutcase sworn in as President of the United States, the Electoral College is now doing just the opposite.

Should TV Stations Ban False Political Ads?

Here’s an interesting question to ponder; please go to link to read the complete article at The Balance by Glenn Halbrooks.

images-1.jpg“Lies!” That’s what many politicians would say after seeing an opponent’s campaign ad on television. Those politicians often demand that TV stations ban advertisements that they claim contain false information.

Voters often wonder why TV stations don’t investigate political advertisements to verify their truthfulness before allowing them to be shown on television. That way, the alleged lies never hit the airwaves.

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Paradox of Automation

Interesting.

Crash: how computers are setting us up for disaster

by Tim Harford at theguardian.com

The paradox of automation, then, has three strands to it. First, automatic systems accommodate incompetence by being easy to operate and by automatically correcting mistakes. Because of this, an inexpert operator can function for a long time before his lack of skill becomes apparent his incompetence is a hidden weakness that can persist almost indefinitely. Second, even if operators are expert, automatic systems erode their skills by removing the need for practice. Third, automatic systems tend to fail either in unusual situations or in ways that produce unusual situations, requiring a particularly skilful response. A more capable and reliable automatic system makes the situation worse.

ibm-704-1954_thumb1Back in the late 1970s I was responsible for supporting an then state-of-the-art communications system (think airline reservation system) with the latest hardware and the most elegant coding. However, at that time the console for the system was a Model 33 Teletypewriter (unless, as we occasionally were forced to do, you input instructions through the front-panel toggle switches).

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