Trump/Trump in 2016

imgres.jpgI was reading a fun article online that reviewed all the likely contenders for Donald Trump to select from as his running mate. The post considered Newt Gingrich as the No.1 contender, followed by Mary Fallin (although I heard bad things coming out of Oklahoma where she is now Governor), Chris (Bend-Over) Christie, Bob Corker (who is unsure if Trump is fit to be President), and Joni (Grab Your Balls) Ernst.

Just a side note: Joni Ernst is too dumb to know that the bread bags go inside your shoes or boots in the winter.

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Literary Flip-Flop

The Bookends post in the NYT Book Review Section often poses some interesting questions for the two commentators to reflect on. The current question is a good one:

Which Authors Did You Have to Grow Into?

imgres.jpgLiesl Schillinger offered Ernest Hemingway as the author she disliked at first and later one was “ravished by the writing, and bewildered by my adolescent antipathy.” This is interesting to me because I had quite the opposite reaction to Hemingway: as a youth I was told Hemingway was great so I thought he was great but when I grew up I realized Hemingway (at least in his novels) was highly overrated.

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Naughty Bits, Lion Heads, and Brawndo

Adam-Eve-Michelangelo-L-1I have maintained for years that religious morals dictated that sex and naughty body parts should be hidden from view for the simple reason that sex and parts and bodily functions are too easily associated with the rest of the animal kingdom and if the human animal is actually a separate creation in the image of a god, then it’s best to cover-up any hints that man might be closer aligned with the animals of the world—the beings which we can see and touch—rather than to a primitive spirit—the being that no one has ever seen or touched outside of the fiction.

I continue to believe this. It’s like the christian scam that was implemented at the behest of the fish industry to refrain from eating meat on Fridays lest you be in violation of god’s law.

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Why We Never Get Over Our First Love

The article in the Washington Post caught my attention: Why we never really get over that first love.

images.jpgLong after it ends, our first love maintains some power over us. A haunting, bittersweet hold on our psyches, pulling us back to what was and what can never be again. Unless . . . ?
But why? Why should this one lodge in our brains any differently than the others, even when the others were longer, better, more right? They just weren’t quite as intense as the first.
The scientific research on this topic is thin, but the collective wisdom among psychologists says it’s a lot like skydiving. Meaning, you’ll remember the first time you jumped out of an airplane much more clearly than the 10th time you took the leap.

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