Focus

download.jpgI have long been aware that one’s ability to read books at a steady pace and to get ‘er done is not dependent on the speed of your eye movement or the amount of text you can take in at one time but rather is is directly related to how well you can focus your concentration. Naturally your comprehension and memory are also enhances by staying focused.

I was a senior in High School when I began to experiment with various methods of improving my reading speed. They even had a reading lab where you could pace your reading by having a mechanical shutter close-off sentences at controllable speeds. Everyone cheated, of course, the winner being the person attesting to the fastest reading speed. If I recall, there was a rumor that someone had reached supersonic speeds … but that was just for a paragraph or two that the machine presented in a limited fashion.

I remember trying to calculate the speed at which the pages would have to be turned in order to make such astronomical speeds possible.

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Once Again …

images-1.jpg… not all of the February reading suggestions I had intended were actually posted on this weblog. Quelle dommage! Just so no one misses out on my musings during the month of February, I’ll publish the complete list (I do this anyway, even if I’m always punctual posting my suggestions).

You might not have noticed but I have been slipping several newer texts into my reading list, texts that often were included in recent suggestion lists. I suspect I’ll need a few more months reading books that haven’t hit the remainders stack yet, but so far I’m not enthused by the state of today’s new publications.

I will suggest, however, that a lot of the literature coming out of Africa, the Middle East, and South America, is a better route to good reading than sticking to American or British books. I suppose Joseph Roux put it in perspective: “Literature was formerly an art and finance a trade; today it is the reverse.” This, of course, pertains to much of what we consider the Western World. The Capitalism monster even devours literature.

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Candy: You Know You Want It

VOLUME 19, Number 3: Candy

In my three months’ binge of Drag Race, while Violet Chachki experimented with new ways to cinch her waist, I experimented with backward baseball hats and letterman jackets. Under the influence of sequins and glitter, I figured out which boyish colors went best with my skin tone: navy, brown, gray, and dark green. Raglan became my favorite word. At the age of twenty-seven, I learned how to tie boat shoes. I bled breaking in my inaugural pair, like a new queen strutting in stilettos for the first time. . . . The advice I have for my boyhood ghost is something that’s never come out of a drag queen’s mouth. To him, I say, it’s okay to fit in—it’s okay to enjoy and flaunt the style of the thing that’s also oppressing you. 

—LOGAN SCHERER, “After the Glitter Ball

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