Capitalism Is Over

capitalismI have been reading a lot on the internet, catching up with the holidays where I tended to veg-out under the covers. This article in Salon originally appeared in the TomDispatch written by Rebecca Solnit. The article makes a strong point for what I will conclude is a reactionary capitalistic oligarchy having gone too far in the pursuit of vast profits at the expense of the health of this planet and the whole concept of truth and empathy, opting instead for lying, corruption, and strong-arm tactics to subdue the country and have it bow to their wishes.

Rebecca Solmit assesses our poisonous fossil fuel dependency — and why we’re on the verge of a paradigm shift. I think there’s an old adage in history: if you go too far, someone will invent a guillotine (or something to that effect).

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The Remarkable Raymond Federman

FedermanRaymond Federman is one of those authors whose personal story is equally as fascinating as anything most writers come up with. It’s so interesting that Federman uses it as the basic of most of his own writing, with one caveat: Federman insists that he cannot tell the difference between imagination and reality. So, this Federman who is the hero of all the novels … is he the real Federman, an embellished Federman, based on Federman, Federman-like, what Federman wishes Federman was, just a horny French Jew who tells a lot of stories?

The reality is that Raymond Federman grew up in Paris as a very recognizable Jew (he calls attention to his nose constantly) until the Nazis marched into Paris and he was initially hidden and eventually smuggled to the relative safety of Vichy France. His family—mother, father, and two sisters—stayed behind and went to their deaths in the Nazi camps. Raymond, of course, did not know the fate of his family and expected to be reunited with them in Paris after the end of the conflict.

Federman’s novel, Return To Manure, tells the story of his three years working on a farm in the south of France.

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Going All the Way

What is on the other side?

Julien Gracq’s award winning novel The Opposing Shore is an interesting and mentally stimulating narrative of boundaries and what happens when we hibernate behind those boundaries. It has been suggested that The Opposing Shore is metaphorical for the attitude of France at the beginning of the Second World War: remember the Maginot Line?

imagesThe Maginot Line dominated French military thinking in the inter-war years. The Maginot Line was a vast fortification that spread along the French/German border but became a military liability when the Germans attacked France in the spring of 1940 using blitzkrieg – a tactic that completely emasculated the Maginot Line’s purpose. — The History Learning Site

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