Bruno’s Dream

images-1.jpgLet’s see: Bruno is in bed, expected to die. He peruses his father’s stamp collection (symbolic?) and his own books of spiders. Several people take care of him: his son-in-law (whose wife died and is a bit of a cad), a younger woman who cleans and cooks and keeps the son-in-law warm at night, a somewhat untrustworthy caregiver, and later two visiting women associated with Bruno’s estranged son.

There are a few other characters to complicate the narrative and one overriding theme:  most of the characters seem to fall in love with one or more of the other characters, usually inappropriately.

Most of the novel goes by, tossing human complications this way and that, before you get to anything that might constitute Bruno’s Dream. Up until the last part of the book the reader might suspect that all the love and sex confusion would be revealed as just a dream (Bobby Ewing?). But then:

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And the Rains Came

RainI live in South Carolina—the Low Country—but just across the river from Georgia so the last several rainy days were gloomy but at best (worst?) we thoroughly watered the grasses, making walking the dogs a squishy experience. Other parts of the state were not so lucky and although the rain is apparently over, the waters are still rising.

Two interesting things came out of this millennial flood: the small government conservatives were johnny-on-the-spot holding out their hands for Federal disaster assistance and the religious right insisted the floods were clear evidence that God was not pleased with our treatment of Israel. Oh, no one on the conservative side of the aisle even whispered any suggestion that climate change might have played a part in the disaster.

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