The Knight Is In His Castle

img_0041It’s been a crazy few weeks. The construction on my new rooms at my daughter’s house forced me to relocate with my dogs. Luckily there was a place offering small suites with kitchenette and dog privileges so I moved in there for about ten days. Although I had internet access and plenty of digital texts on my iPhone and iPad, I had limited tools to keep up on most of my online life, including this website.

I, unfortunately, never accomplished the dream of reading dozens of books while sequestered in that lonely, quite room. I tried watching television and quasi-enjoyed two movies but for the most part the television was turned off and I continued listening to old-time radio mysteries on my iPhone.

I did read some—finished two novels—but mostly just stared at the screen with Sam Spade solving crimes in the background.

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Having Drank the Apple Juice

AppleIn 1977 I bought my first Apple computer: a venerable Apple ][ with 48K of memory and eventually my first floppy disk drive (at work we had eight inchers but this was 5.25).That Apple ][ lasted me several years and was eventually replaced by an IBM clone and later sold to a friend for his daughter. During its life I added a memory card (another 16K!!!), a modem card (300 Baud, no doubt), and learned Pascal when Apple made it available. It’s hard to believe now but I had a custom suitcase that allowed me to carry my Apple ][ with three disk drives and a bunch of other stuff which I used when I took my computer to work (there were no personal-type computers where I worked even though I was in the Computer Department). I loved my Apple ][ and the IBM clone only lasted a few months before I was severely strapped for cash and had to sell the whole thing to an accountant who needed to run Lotus 1-2-3.

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Where Did June Go?

readingJune was a terrible month for reading around my house. First, I did become much too involved in television series on Netflix (especially the UK version of Shameless) and then I spent a week out of town visiting my little grand-daughter (she’s on the verge of taking those first few unassisted steps) and also spending some time with my daughter and her hard-working husband.

One thing productive we did while I was visiting was to sign-up for a new cell phone family plan that included me which (of course) instantly dragged the old man into the digital age with a new Smartphone. Up until this last weekend I was perfectly happy with my bullet-proof flip phone (especially since I tended to clock only four or five minutes a month) but my daughter started complaining that she couldn’t send me texts and as far a photos of the baby … forgiddaboutit. But when I discovered all the great things I could do with a Smartphone even if I didn’t need to make phone calls I began to see the future and it looked a lot like an iPhone.

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Stop Praying To Our iPhones

iPhoneDisclaimer: I do not own an iPhone. In fact, I waste a great deal of money on the digital phone I do have (phone, camera, that’s it) because my current calling plan is the minimum discounted plan (I worked for the company) giving me 450 minutes each month … I use 2. But my daughter says she is tired of not being able to text me or share photos instantly and all the other social activities a smart phone allows so I have agreed to be added to her family plan and get an iPhone (which my neighbor laughingly says is not a phone but a pocket computer). This plan will make my daughter happier and actually make my monthly bill go away: it’s a good deal. Now I can only suggest that I will use the iPhone for periodic communication but otherwise, at least it replaces my old, old iPod Touch (and my loyal Flip Phone).

But the topic is not my own limited use of a future device but rather the suggestion made by W. Andrew Ewell in Salon that:

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