Susperia de Profundis

images.jpgI read so many different titles last month that adding a listof suggested reading seems like overkill. Then again, I have myself read few of the suggested books so maybe I should take my own suggestions.

Right now, however, I am torn between three basic avenues of reading: first I am having a lot of fun reading all that genre fiction I have eschewed through the years, specifically detective and mystery stories; second, as my remaining years beckon, I find there are so many classical or otherwise challenging books I have yet to read; and finally there are just so many books and stories out there that I know I will never come close to catching up and promise me get a taste of an almost limitless variety of literature—a veritable smorgasbord of reading.

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Forty Mike Shaynes Equals Two George Eliots

imagesLooking back over last month’s collection of suggested reading I am struck by the high number of titles I want to see on in personal reading pool without too much delay. This brings up a perpetual problem in my reading plans.

There are, perhaps, four major themes in my reading which are currently demanding to receive the greatest part of my attention. Right now I am happily reading one detective story after another, always with a sense of fun and entertainment, but never without a sense of sacrificing the last months and years left to me to less than enlightening literature. So maybe I need to concentrate on classical novels for a while: all those Victorians that once were societies entertainments but now are fodder for university study. Continue reading

Future Hit List

lead_720_405There are actually a few titles on last month’s list of suggestions to try that I added to my own private list for reading in the near future. Which ones? Well, one is very fat, one is pretty funny in a twisted way, and at least two have been hanging around way too long and need to be read.

I note that more and more non-fiction titles are making the daily suggest list, despite the fact that there is no such thing as non-fiction. As I think about it, these non-fiction books are attractive to me because of their ability to teach us new things. Of course this can only follow after fiction has taught us how to think in the first place.

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May My Reading Keep Me Young

download-4.jpgThe year is rapidly running down and soon I will have over 350 reading suggestions that make me panic. Time is running out. Sitting here in my office I scan the double files of books on my built-in bookshelves and realize that I will never read them all. Time is running out. If I stop and think about it, I’m torn between reading as many of the classical novels as I can fit in or concentrating on the more entertaining books that would probably be more fun to read.

So which would you opt for, Henry James or Mickey Spillane, the Venerable Bede or Agatha Christie? Do novels that are older than you, telling stories about a world longago keep you young, relatively, or are new books with modern problems and hip language force you to keep up with a younger group of readers and the topics that are of current interest?

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