Summer Is a Great Time For Reading

c9561b9a-44a3-43d4-8869-880c07e9b86d.jpgIt’s here! Tin House #76: Summer Reading (Vol. 19, No. 4). Now that I’m getting back to normal (sorta), it’s comforting to have easy access to some great reading in one of my favorite literary journals.

That night, though, a bad thought came to her as she drowsed in the old rump-sprung armchair near the bed. Where did Mr. Cowper keep his money?

She couldn’t worry about it then, in the middle of the night. But she did. Next day as soon as she’d got him looked after she went into the other room of the two he’d sub-rented from her and Petey two weeks ago and looked around. She felt like a criminal, but she looked into his coat pockets, and at the pocketbook she found there, which had twelve dollars in it. She checked the little chest of drawers where he’d put his shirts and stuff. There was nothing else of his in the room but some books and papers on the worktable, and under the table the little humpback trunk that was all his luggage.

He’d locked it, but there was a trunk key lying out on the table with what had been in his pockets when he went up to the mine. She had to look.

—URSULA K. LE GUIN, “Pity and Shame”

Continue reading

More Summer Reading From Tin House

TH72-cover-467x600In case you need a steady supply of excellent reading material, look no further than Tin House Magazine. The Summer Reading issue is just out and here’s what the editor has to say about it:

In this issue, Tracy K. Smith captures a kind of awakening, via her young daughter, in her stunning poem “Dusk.” In Carmen Machado’s story “Blur,” the protagonist sees the future clearly despite losing her glasses. In a previously untranslated story, “Pride,” by Albert Camus, God wonders “In a world where seeking is impossible and everything is known, why then have the mind?” And Alexander Chee delivers gin-inspired revelations discovered on his global search for the perfect Martini.

Continue reading

Summer Reading At Tin House

M-TH68-SK-rgb.jpgIt’s here .. the latest issue of Tin House Magazine. But even more important, I can now access the digital edition of the journal, thus saving me space in my soon-to-be restrictive digs down in Florida.

The new Tin House is #68 and is the annual Summer Reading issue. Just flipping through the pages I can see that there is a great deal of reading here that I will have to balance against my planned bookshelf reduction I so carefully detailed in advance of having to pack up my books prior to my move.

Here’s what they say:

Summer Reading

Contents

Fiction: Dorthe Nors, Malerie Willens, Jean-Philippe Toussaint, Saša Stanišić, Deb Olin Unferth, Michael Braunschweig, Alexis M. Smith, Eric Puchner, Josh Weil, Sean Ennis, Jackson Tobin

Features: Michael Dickman, Marin Sardy

Poetry: Dorianne Laux, Sam Riviere, John Ashbery, Joseph Millar, Michael Burkard, Per Aage Brandt, Anna Journey

Lost & Found: Nathan Gauer, Alexandra Pechman, Sarah Bridgins, Joel Drucker, Whitney Otto

Continue reading

Beach Bag Books for Old Farts

BeachIt’s that time again when AARP makes a few suggests for adult summer reading. I suppose that the designation of “beach reads” allows for a tendency to suggest breezy popular fare but I can reasonably predict that I will not be reading any of these titles this summer. In New Jersey we rented a house at the Shore every year and three families (or so) spent a week or two toasting in the sun, overeating, and trying to read while the swim suits got smaller and smaller on the women and girls cavorting in the surf (so distracting). For me this was a chance to read some of those truly fat and difficult books that otherwise would gather dust on my shelves year after year. For some reason I tended to go for the Russian authors.

I know I read these titles while laying on the beach in the hot sun:

Continue reading