True Crime

VOLUME 19, Number 1: True Crime

The town claimed to be shocked by the arrests, but most confided that they’d always known Penny Misko would end up doing something like this. She’d always been a liar and a drunk; it was not hard to imagine that she could leave a neighbor in the road not twenty feet from her front door . . . The more compassionate suggested that maybe she hadn’t known she’d hit someone, but they’d been dismissed. The car’s windshield had been replaced! The police who’d retrieved it from the body shop said the damage was “consistent with something large striking it.” Something like Brenda Leroy’s head. The Miskos had left her in the street, and they’d sat there at their kitchen table listening to the ambulance come and go, and they’d lied, lied, and lied again. And Brenda was their neighbor. She’d known them her whole life. Penny had worked with Brenda’s mother at the sleeping bag factory. Penny Misko was a terrible person. Not guilty? they said. Please.

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More Summer Reading From Tin House

TH72-cover-467x600In case you need a steady supply of excellent reading material, look no further than Tin House Magazine. The Summer Reading issue is just out and here’s what the editor has to say about it:

In this issue, Tracy K. Smith captures a kind of awakening, via her young daughter, in her stunning poem “Dusk.” In Carmen Machado’s story “Blur,” the protagonist sees the future clearly despite losing her glasses. In a previously untranslated story, “Pride,” by Albert Camus, God wonders “In a world where seeking is impossible and everything is known, why then have the mind?” And Alexander Chee delivers gin-inspired revelations discovered on his global search for the perfect Martini.

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Ever Been In Rehab?

24e07088-c872-4086-b202-b28af6d27b8eAre you addicted to something or someone? J.T.S.Brown? Oxycontin? Chocolate Fudge Cake? Michelle Williams? Barnyard Smells? Do you have an addictive personality (like the man who walked into the All-You-Can-Eat restaurant and said, “I’ll take two”)? Do addictions amplify our lives or do we engage in our addictions to hide from living?

Have you ever been to rehab?

The newest issue of Tin House Magazine (Volume 18, Number 3) addresses some of these questions with excellent writing on the subject. I urge you to find a copy (or get a subscription) to expand your awareness of the world of rehab and addiction in a very literary manner.

Get addicted to Tin House Magazine.

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More Winter Reading

TH70-SK-1.jpgThe most recent Winter Reading edition of Tin House magazine is out and for many it will provide welcome relief from all those big fat books calling us from our bucket lists.

I find literary journals such as Tin House and Conjunctions both introduce me to new and often exciting authors, but they also provide a less demanding effort on my part, if only in that such journals generally contain shorter pieces and excerpts. This allows the little gray cells to rejuvenate while still being jiggled around a bit.

I find this especially important in the winter months when I might not be able to run around in the sun to restore my batteries (actually, I don’t run around anywhere nowadays … my best exercise comes from a rousing coughing binge).

Here is what the editor says about the #70 issue of Tin House:

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