Finally, a good reason to carry a gun

Reading William S. Burroughs (Cities of the Red Night) and he writes in the chapter titled “Etranger Qui Passait” that a contingent of mercenaries is traveling across the desert

Burroughs… naked except for desert boots, packs, and belts with eighteen-inch Bowie knives and ten shot revolvers chambered for a high-speed 22-caliber cartridge. They have automatic carbines of the same caliber in their packs, with thirty-shot clips. These weapons may be needed if a time warp dumps an old western posse in their laps.

The NRA and every Right-Wing gun nut in the country is free to use the logic expressed by Burroughs: after all, it makes just as much sense as the wing-nut excuses we hear from most of these people.

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XFX: Experimental Reading for the Fourth Quarter

Sausagey SantaThis last quarter of 2014 we will read a novel that begins a very interesting trilogy, a strange and often disturbing book (which has pictures to support the text), a themed collection of short stories by an often overlooked writer, and a dash of Bizarro from the master.

That’s four books but none are too long or difficult. Besides, think of sitting alone in the evening waiting for Santa to arrive and casually reading about a bizarre Hungry Bug (what was that noise in the corner behind the electric fireplace?).

So, read all four; read one or two; or read other experiment fiction that you might be planning to read. Note also that I avoided anything obvious for the holidays, but there is always Sausagey Santa if you’re so inclined. Carlton Mellick III and the Bizarro crowd have some strange alternatives to quench your Christmas cheer.

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XFX: Fourth Quarter Reading

The new quarter has snuck up on us here and we want to introduce the exellent titles which have been selected for reading over the next three months.

The first book (10-16) is by an excellent German author that should be required reading for anyone interested in post-war literature:  Hermann Broch. The title we selected isn’t one of the author’s big and hairy novels but the more approachable novel: The Unknown Quantity. Here is a little review:

Born in Germany in the early twentieth century, mild and sensitive Richard Hieck endured a quietly difficult childhood. Raised in humble circumstances, Richard was profoundly influenced by his withdrawn mother and by his father — an enigma whose devotion centered not on his five children but on his mysterious career. From his father, Richard inherited an interest in the night sky, learning to love the constellations and to take comfort in the strength of Orion and the warm radiance of Venus. At the same time, his shadowy, elusive father influenced Richard to pursue studies in mathematics, a field offering the discipline Richard had craved as a child.In The Unknown Quantity, Hermann Broch examines the underlying chaos — and, finally, the impossibility — of life within a society whose values are in decay. As Richard seeks to reconcile the conflicting demands of love and science, of passion and reason, he and those in his orbit must endure the effects of societal and family values — even as the values descend into madness.

The second book (11-01) is another sorter novel from the twisted and always fascinating mind of William S. Burroughs. Many have read Naked Lunch and do not realize that Burroughs has many other novels to his credit; this one starts the Nova Trilogy and is titled, The Soft Machine.

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