Summer Sanctuary

Conj70frntonlyThis is one of two months of the year when quarterly and bi-annual journals show up in my mailbox with a one-two punch of stimulating new reading. No sooner had I begun flipping through Tin House when another thick issue of Conjunctions opened up even more impediments to my often chaotic published reading lists. But I’m not complaining!

Newly published:  Conjunctions:70, Sanctuary: The Preservation Issue

Start your summer reading with innovative new work by Diane Ackerman, Heather Altfeld, Rae Armantrout, Mary Jo Bang, Mauro Javier Cardenas, J’Lyn Chapman, Julia Elliott, Andrew Ervin, William Gaddis, Peter Gizzi, Rae Gouirand, Robin Hemley, Troy Jollimore, Robert Karron, Madeline Kearin, Marshall Klimasewiski, Byron Landry, Nam Le, Maria Lioutaia, Andrew Mossin, Debra Nystrom, Toby Olson, Peter Orner, Richard Powers, Jessica Reed, Donald Revell, Elizabeth Robinson, Joanna Ruocco, Kyra Simone, Erin Singer, Maya Sonenberg, Donna Stonecipher, Arthur Sze, S. P. Tenhoff, Daniel Torday, and Frederic Tuten.

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More Winter Reading From Tin House

VOLUME 19, Number 2: Winter Reading

Dad couldn’t stop smiling as he demonstrated the trap’s operation. The inner workings were so efficient that it barely made a noise, just a faint click and a soft flourish like an umbrella being opened. Dad had designed the trap to accommodate a raccoon the size of a sheepdog, but he still worried that it might maim the creature if it wasn’t calibrated just right. Eventually he went into the garage to take from the deep freeze one of the birthday cakes he’d purchased for bait, placing it on my skateboard and rolling it to the middle of the platform. If the cake survived the trap he said we could celebrate by having it for dessert that night.

So writes Seth Fried as he takes us on a family’s strange and tender journey to capture a mischievous raccoon.

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More Winter Reading

TH70-SK-1.jpgThe most recent Winter Reading edition of Tin House magazine is out and for many it will provide welcome relief from all those big fat books calling us from our bucket lists.

I find literary journals such as Tin House and Conjunctions both introduce me to new and often exciting authors, but they also provide a less demanding effort on my part, if only in that such journals generally contain shorter pieces and excerpts. This allows the little gray cells to rejuvenate while still being jiggled around a bit.

I find this especially important in the winter months when I might not be able to run around in the sun to restore my batteries (actually, I don’t run around anywhere nowadays … my best exercise comes from a rousing coughing binge).

Here is what the editor says about the #70 issue of Tin House:

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Winter Reading

TH66-PG1I’m shortly going to be moving down to Florida to join my daughter in her new home. There’s lots of space but I will have to cut down on the number of ink and paper books I keep around and rely even more on digital editions and my trusty iPad. But one thing concerns me: I normally do not save books after I have read them (only scholarly texts and books I want to study further, as a rule) but that doesn’t hold true for journals and collections. I tend to read a little here and a little there in these types of books.

So the question is: what do I do with my years of Tin House and Conjunctions?

Time is short and just to force my hand, Issue 66 of Tin House arrived in my mailbox. Look at the goodies in this issue … who wouldn’t want to add these authors to their winter reading list:

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