The End

220px-Tin_House.jpgI have an interesting track record with literary publications … they keep disappearing, often just after I renew my subscription. Unfortunately, in this case it is one of my very favorites.  Tin House has accompanied me through many years of excellent reading.

I will miss it.

Dear Tin House Reader,

Tin House’s 20th Anniversary Issue, to be published in June 2019, will be the publication’s last. I’m grateful to Rob Spillman, Elissa Schappell, and Holly MacArthur, and the entire magazine staff, current and past, for their part in creating a vital, versatile outlet, and hosting important literary and cultural conversations over the past twenty years. It has been a remarkable run.

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Winter Reading

VOLUME 20, Number 2: Winter Reading

d51a43c9-f505-44d6-8d52-26baee6a8294.jpgOf that “season in hell” I very well remember the twenty days that I was interned in the military mental hospital. The reason? One morning in the barracks at a very early hour, in less than ten minutes I very methodically drank a bottle of cognac, smoked hashish and kef, and took five amphetamines. Two hours later during the military drills, under the influence of that ferocious mixture, I shot my gun at the clouds. They asked what had gotten into me and I explained that I was crazy.

—ENRIQUE VILA-MATAS, “The Literature of No”

Hunter S. Thompson said “When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.” To us this means, when the world is at its most chaotic, problematic, and inscrutable, that is when the outcasts, misfits, and true artists are able to make sense of the senseless, or at least transmogrify the disorder into their own order. Emotional turmoil—even pain—promises renewal, renaissance, new journeys, new projects, fresh ideas. In this Winter Reading, we celebrate our weird heroes, upheaval, and the surfacing that must precede art. After all, if anyone can find meaning in entropy and turn to freeze into a flower, she’s an artist.

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Makes Sense

Yale psychiatrist explains how devotion to Trump is based on
emotional patterns most people grow out of by age five.

angry-trump-supporter-shutterstockRaw Story spoke with Yale psychiatry professor Bandy X. Lee on why the president’s supporters show such undying devotion to a man who’s repeatedly reneged on promises and whose tumultuous first term has been filled with shake-ups.

Bandy X. Lee: The sense of grandiose omnipotence that he displays seems especially appealing to his emotionally-needy followers. No matter what the world says, he fights back against criticism, continues to lie in the face of truth, and above all is still president. What matters is that he is winning, not whether he is honest or law-abiding. This may seem puzzling to the rest of us, but when you are overcome with feelings of powerlessness, this type of cartoonish, exaggerated force is often more important than true ability. This is the more primitive morality, as we call it, of “might makes right,” which in normal development you grow out of by age five.

Read the full article at Raw Story.

As Another Year Fades Away

download-1.jpgWell I’m walking well but my eyesight sucks. Thank goodness for electronic manipulation of the text (bigger and more distinct) otherwise I’d be back to the curved page of an actual book and the further distorted view through even the best magnifying device held in my shaking hand.

This last month of the year I have a rather diverse pool of proposed reading. I started with the Oasis trilogy which I finally got the order of the books right and just to keep up with the idea of a trilogy opted for the three collected short novels of Gina Berriault. I almost went back to three novels by Kurt Vonnegut but instead filled in the list with a scattering of previously suggested novels or books I have been wanting to read for some time.

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