It’s November Already?

images.jpgI might be jumping the gun a little bit here but realizing that November only has 30 days and that I hope to read, amongst others, Gaddis’s The Recognitions, Dumas’s The Count of Monte Cristo, and the final volume of Dos Passos’s U. S. A. Trilogy, The Big Money, I decided needed an extra day or two.

So I stopped reading from the October list, moved most of the titles from October to November (to at least suggest I still intend to read them) and dropped in several new titles I had been considering for the November pool. Thus, some old and some new but moreover a commitment to reading a few of the big fat ones that have eluded me too long.

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Books On Fire

images.jpgFollowing my own advice, this month’s reading pool is a combination of genre fiction, best-sellers, and classics. It maybe a little light on classics but August needed to be balanced. I can’t really recommend a couple of these books because I have not verified their quality but rather I was intrigued by their title or a short description I might have read in a catalogue. I believe I’m actually more often disappointed by what are generally considered “good” books than I am by these unknown and often eye-opening texts. Give them a try (but balance them with solid classics).

Will I be forced to add any of these titles to my Worst reading list? Last month’s Death of Virgil was a strong candidate but other readers certainly will not agree. Maybe it should have made my Most Painful list instead?

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Is That a Gat or …

download.jpgI confessed recently that I have an uncontrollable urge to read a mess of detective fiction. I recognize several strong influences, any one of which might boost Mickey Spillane ahead of Henry James on my short-term reading lists. But there are two facts that I need to recognize before I go full-out Peter Whimsey: first, I never have abandoned the fun of mystery stories like I have the tedium of science fiction (look at my reading lists: there’s a mystery or two almost every month), and second, there is so many examples of mystery or detective fiction available and being written every day — so many that no one, let alone I, would ever hope to read them all.

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Time To Roll the Big Stones Up the Hill

820100841This is going to be a catch up month with a limited number of big fat books that have been growing old in the back corner of my library. Luckily I now have digital verions of each of the titles so I cn put my squint back in the drawer and set my concentration level to maximum as I hope to plow through a couple thousand pages and read (or finish reading) so rather challenging books

First, there’s Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel. This one isn’t really a challenge but it happens to be the book I was reading when time raan out in April so why stop? Note: I’m not in love with this book and my die of boredom before the month concludes.

The second title is the oldest must-read in my library. Since I have started Infinite Jest two times in the past only to relegate it to a doorstop par excellence, I hope I can pick up where I left off without too much disruption to the narrative … wait, this is David Foster Wallace … no problem.

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